10 Aussie expressions to master | G’day, mate

Sep 18, 2017 by

10 Aussie expressions to master | G’day, mate

10 Aussie expressions to master | G’day, mate

 

 

In honor of Australia Day (celebrated on the 26th January) and our laid back brothers and sisters Down Under, we’ve put together a list of ten Aussie expressions everyone should master (along with the world-famous “Aussie, Aussie, Aussie, Oi, oi, oi” chant, of course!)

Aussies are as relaxed about their language as they are about life, so using some (or all) of these expressions will bring your stress levels down and help you see the world from that characteristically chilled out Aussie perspective. If you’re a foreigner living in Australia or planning to visit soon, making an extra effort to adopt some of the slang is essential for your survival as everyone from the handsome barista at your favorite coffee shop to the Prime Minister will be using it.

We’ve thrown in a few pronunciation tips at the end so you sound as authentic as possible when you test out those “g’day’s” and “good on ya’s” on your new “mates”.

1. “Aussie”

What does it mean? Obvious and easy (we hope). You won’t catch Australians calling themselves Australian. They’ll say Aussie. Why, you ask? Well, it’s shorter to start. It also sounds more friendly and cuddly, just like those koala bears you’ve always dreamed of hugging.

How do you use it? “Did you meet my friend yesterday?” “You mean the Aussie? Yes, I did.”

2. “Mate”

What does it mean? Another word for friend. Common in Britain as well, but used even more enthusiastically by Aussies, who pepper the ends of their sentences with a longer, stretched out “maaaaate” that conveys friendliness and establishes a relaxed bond between the speakers. Can also be used to start a sentence, for effect.

How do you use it? “Sorry, can you tell me what time the train leaves?”, “At 2 o’clock, mate” or “Mate. You won’t believe what I saw”.

3. “G’day”

What does it mean? General greeting, used instead of “hello”, both day and night. Often combined with “mate”, as in…

How do you use it? “G’day, mate!” (mostly used by men though, not so often by women.)

4. “How are you going?”

What does it mean? Nothing to do with where you may or may not be going. Aussies use it to ask “how are you?” or to say “are you OK?” or “do you need help (with that task)?”

How do you use it? When someone asks: “How are you going?”, you can just answer normally with a “Good, thanks” or “Good, but…” if you need help with something and the question was formulated with that angle in mind.

5. “Good on ya”

What does it mean? Short for “good on you”. Way to show approval (like “well done”, “good job”) and express heartfelt congratulations. Also used to replace expressions like “really?”, “oh yeah” etc. in casual conversation. It can also be used sarcastically, ie. when you want to be a little mean, but don’t want to actually utter a mean word.

How do you use it? Positive: “Good on ya, mate. You really aced that exam!” Sarcastic: “You broke a surf board again. Good on ya, mate.”

6. “I’m stuffed”

What does it mean? Americans would use this to mean they’re full (of food), but Aussies also use it to say that they’re tired or in trouble.

How do you use it? Depends on what you want to say. If you want to say you’re tired, just say “I had a tough day at work today. I’m stuffed.”

7. “No worries”

What does it mean? Used to mean everything from “you’re welcome” to “relax”. You’ll hear this one all the time in lots of different situations.

How do you use it? “Thanks for buying me that concert ticket.” “No worries.”

8. “Togs”

What does it mean? Swimsuit, swim trunks

How do you use it? “Don’t forget your togs, we’re going to the beach today!”

9. “Barbie”

What does it mean? Short for barbeque, not the toy you played with as a kid. Aussies are almost as committed to barbecuing as South Africans and Americans, and even holidays like Christmas are celebrated with a relaxed, sun-soaked family barbie at the beach, not a formal sit-down dinner like in Europe.

How do you use it? “Rob’s having a barbie at the beach today.”

10. “Esky”

What does it mean? Portable (drinks) cooler for short. Aussies bring their eskys with them to that said beach barbie in order to keep the drinks cool. It gets really hot in the summer in Australia, so you better have that esky on hand to keep the cool drinks flowing and your body temperature at tolerable levels.

How do you use it? “Don’t forget the esky! It’s hot out today!”

BONUS: Aussies don’t pronounce r’s at the end of words (they say “foreva”, “togetha” etc. instead of “forever”, “together”) or g’s (they say “fishin’, drivin’ etc. instead of “fishing” or “driving”). More pronunciation tips here.

Image by Chrisjtse (Flickr/Creative Commons)

http://www.ef.com/blog/language/10-aussie-expressions-to-master/

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Eminem lose yourself | Academy Award for Best Original Song

Sep 18, 2017 by

Eminem lose yourself | Academy Award for Best Original Song

Eminem lose yourself | Academy Award for Best Original Song

 

Artist: Eminem
Movie: 8 Mile
Released: 2002
Awards: Academy Award for Best Original Song, MORE
Genres: Pop, Hip-hop/rap

 

eminem lose yourself Lyrics

 

Look
If you had
One shot
Or one opportunity
To seize everything you ever wanted
In one moment
Would you capture
Or just let it slip?
Yo
His palms are sweaty, knees weak, arms are heavy
There’s vomit on his sweater already, mom’s spaghetti
He’s nervous, but on the surface he looks calm and ready
To drop bombs, but he keeps on forgettin’
What he wrote down, the whole crowd goes so loud
He opens his mouth, but the words won’t come out
He’s chokin’, how, everybody’s jokin’ now
The clocks run out, times up, over, blaow!
Snap back to reality, oh there goes gravity
Oh, there goes Rabbit, he choked
He’s so mad, but he won’t give up that easy? No
He won’t have it, he knows his whole back city’s ropes
It don’t matter, he’s dope, he knows that, but he’s broke
He’s so stacked that he knows, when he goes back to his mobile home, that’s when its
Back to the lab again yo, this whole rhapsody
He better go capture this moment and hope it don’t pass him
You better lose yourself in the music, the moment
You own it, you better never let it go
You only get one shot, do not miss your chance to blow
This opportunity comes once in a lifetime you better
[x2]
The souls escaping, through this hole that its gaping
This world is mine for the taking
Make me king, as we move toward a, new world order
A normal life is borin’, but super stardom’s close to post mortem
It only grows harder, only grows hotter
He blows us all over these hoes is all on him
Coast to coast shows, he’s known as the globetrotter
Lonely roads, God only knows, he’s grown farther from home, he’s no father
He goes home and barely knows his own daughter
But hold your nose ’cause here goes the cold water
His hoes don’t want him no mo, he’s cold product
They moved on to the next schmo who flows, he nose dove and sold nada
So the soap opera is told and unfolds, I suppose it’s old partna, but the beat goes on
Da da dumb da dumb da da
You better lose yourself in the music, the moment
You own it, you better never let it go
You only get one shot, do not miss your chance to blow
This opportunity comes once in a lifetime you better
[x2]
No more games, I’m a change what you call rage
Tear this motherfuckin’ roof off like two dogs caged
I was playin’ in the beginnin’, the mood all changed
I been chewed up and spit out and booed off stage
But I kept rhymin’ and stepwritin’ the next cipher
Best believe somebody’s payin’ the pied piper
All the pain inside amplified by the
Fact that I can’t get by with my nine to
Five and I can’t provide the right type of
Life for my family ’cause man, these God damn food stamps don’t buy diapers
And its no movie, there’s no Mekhi Phifer
This is my life and these times are so hard
And it’s getting even harder tryin’ to feed and water my seed, plus
See dishonor caught up between bein’ a father and a prima-donna
Baby mama drama screamin’ on and too much
For me to want to say in one spot, another jam or not
Has gotten me to the point, I’m like a snail I’ve got
To formulate a plot fore I end up in jail or shot
Success is my only motherfuckin’ option, failures not
Mom, I love you, but this trail has got to go, I cannot grow old in Salem’s lot
So here I go is my shot
Feet fail me not ’cause maybe the only opportunity that I got
You better lose yourself in the music, the moment
You own it, you better never let it go
You only get one shot, do not miss your chance to blow
This opportunity comes once in a lifetime you better
[x2]
You can do anything you set your mind to, man
Songwriters: Jeffrey Irwin Bass / Luis Edgardo Resto / Marshall B Mathers

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Punjab (British India) (after the Revolt of 1857)

Sep 9, 2017 by

Punjab (British India) (after the Revolt of 1857)

Punjab (British India)

 

Punjab was a province of British India, it was one of the last areas of the Indian subcontinent to fall under British rule. With the end of British rule in 1947 the province was split between India and Pakistan. The area that made up British Punjab streched from Himachal Pradesh in the east to Khyber Pakhtunkhwa in the west, which itself was separated in 1909; has today been split into the following areas:

Punjab Province, Pakistan
Punjab State, India
Haryana State, India
Himachal Pradesh State, India
Delhi State, India (after the Revolt of 1857)
Chandigarh, former part of Punjab
Islamabad Capital Territory, Pakistan

Punjab_under_Ranjit_Singh1823-1839

Punjab_under_Ranjit_Singh1823-1839

 

Meaning
The word Punjab is named from the “five rivers” which flow through it: the Jhelum, Chenab, Ravi, Beas and Sutlej, all tributaries of the Indus.

Geography
The Punjab province of British India was a triangular area of country bordered by the Indus and the Sutlej rivers.

Partition

In 1947, the province of Punjab was divided between the new republics of India and Pakistan. The mostly Muslim western part of the province became Pakistan’s Punjab Province; the mostly Sikh and Hindu eastern part became India’s Punjab state in 1966. Many Hindus and Sikhs lived in the west, and many Muslims lived in the east, and so the partition saw many people displaced and much intercommunal violence. Lahore and Amritsar were at the center of the problem, the British were not sure where to place them – make them part of India or Pakistan. The British decided to hand both cities to India, but because of a lack of control and regulation for the border, Amritsar became part of India while Lahore became part of Pakistan. Areas in west Punjab such as Lahore, Rawalpindi, Multan, Gujrat, had a large Sikh population and many of the residents were attacked or killed by radical Muslims. On the other side in East Punjab cities such as Amritsar, Ludhiana, and Gurdaspur had a majority Muslim population in which many of them were wiped out by Sikh guerrillas who launched an all out war against the Muslims.

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Punjab | Panjab (land of “five rivers”; Punjabi: پنجاب (Shahmukhi); ਪੰਜਾਬ (Gurumukhi))

Sep 9, 2017 by

Punjab | Panjab (land of “five rivers”; Punjabi: پنجاب (Shahmukhi); ਪੰਜਾਬ (Gurumukhi))
Punjab | Panjab (land of "five rivers"; Punjabi: پنجاب (Shahmukhi); ਪੰਜਾਬ (Gurumukhi))


The Punjab (/pʌnˈdʒɑːb/ (About this sound listen), /-ˈdʒæb/, /ˈpʌndʒɑːb/, /-dʒæb/), also spelled Panjab (land of “five rivers”; Punjabi: پنجاب (Shahmukhi); ਪੰਜਾਬ (Gurumukhi)), is a geographical and cultural region in the northern part of the Indian subcontinent, comprising areas of eastern Pakistan and northern India. Not being a political unit, the boundaries of the region are ill-defined and focus on historical accounts.

Until the Partition of India in 1947, the British Punjab Province encompassed the present-day Indian states of Punjab, Haryana, Himachal Pradesh, and Chandigarh, and the Pakistani regions of Punjab and Islamabad Capital Territory. It bordered the Balochistan and Pashtunistan regions to the west, Kashmir to the north, the Hindi Belt to the east, and Rajasthan and Sindh to the south.

The people of the Punjab today are called Punjabis, and their principal language is Punjabi. The main religions of the Punjab region are Islam, Sikhism, and Hinduism. Other religious groups are Christianity, Jainism, Zoroastrianism, and Buddhism. The Punjab region has been inhabited by the Indus Valley Civilisation, Indo-Aryan peoples, and Indo-Scythians, and has seen numerous invasions by the Persians, Greeks, Kushans, Ghaznavids, Timurids, Mughals, Pashtuns, British, and others. The foreign invaders mainly targeted the most productive central region of the Punjab known as the Majha region, which is also the bedrock of Punjabi culture and traditions.

Etymology

 Panjab (land of "five rivers"; Punjabi: پنجاب (Shahmukhi); ਪੰਜਾਬ (Gurumukhi))Etymology

Panjab (land of “five rivers”; Punjabi: پنجاب (Shahmukhi); ਪੰਜਾਬ (Gurumukhi))Etymology

The region was originally called Sapta Sindhu, the vedic land of the seven rivers flowing into the ocean.The later name of the region, Punjab, is a compound of two Persian words,Panj (five) and āb (water), introduced to the region by the Turko-Persian conquerors of India, and more formally popularised during the Mughal Empire. Punjab thus means “The Land of Five Waters”, referring to the rivers Jhelum, Chenab, Ravi, Sutlej, and Beas. All are tributaries of the Indus River, the Chenab being the largest.

 

Physical geography
There are two main definitions of the Punjab region: the 1947 definition and the older 1846–1849 definition. A third definition incorporates both the 1947 and the older definitions but also includes northern Rajasthan on a linguistic basis and ancient river movements.

1947 definition
The 1947 definition defines the Punjab region with reference to the dissolution of British India whereby the then British Punjab Province was partitioned between India and Pakistan. In Pakistan, the region now includes the Punjab province and Islamabad Capital Territory. In India, it includes the Punjab state, Chandigarh, Haryana, and Himachal Pradesh.

Using the 1947 definition, the Punjab borders the Balochistan and Pashtunistan regions to the west, Kashmir to the north, the Hindi Belt to the east, and Rajasthan and Sindh to the south. Accordingly, the Punjab region is very diverse and stretches from the hills of the Kangra Valley to the plains and to the Cholistan Desert.

 

Timeline
3300–1500 BCE: Harappan civilisation
1500–1000 BCE: (Rigvedic) Vedic civilisation
1000–500 BCE: Middle and late Vedic Period
599 BCE: Birth of Mahavira
567–487 BCE: Time of Gautama Buddha
550 BCE – 600 CE: Buddhism remained prevalent
326 BCE: Alexander’s Invasion of Punjab
322–298 BCE: Chandragupta I, Maurya period
273–232 BCE: Reign of Ashoka
125–160 BCE: Rise of the Sakas
2 BCE: Beginning of Rule of the Sakas
45–180: Rule of the Kushans
320–550: Gupta Empire
500: Hunnic Invasion
510–650: Vardhana’s Era
711–713: Muhammad bin Qasim conquers Sindh and small part of Punjab region
713–1200: Rajput states, Kabul Shahi & small Muslim kingdoms
1206–1290: Mamluk dynasty established by Mohammad Ghori
1290–1320: Khilji dynasty established by Jalal ud din Firuz Khilji
1320–1413: Tughlaq dynasty established by Ghiyasuddin Tughlaq
1414–1451: Sayyid dynasty established by Khizr Khan
1451–1526: Lodhi dynasty established by Bahlul Khan Lodhi
1469–1539: Guru Nanak
1526–1707: Mughal rule
1526–1530: Zaheeruddin Muhammad Babur
1530–1540: Nasiruddin Muhammad Humayun
1540–1545: Sher Shah Suri of Afghanistan
1545–1554: Islam Shah Suri
1555–1556: Nasiruddin Muhammad Humayun
1556–1556: Hem Chandra Vikramaditya
1556–1605: Jalaluddin Muhammad Akbar
1605–1627: Nooruddin Muhammad Jahangir
1627–1658: Shahaabuddin Muhammad Shah Jahan
1658–1707: Mohiuddin Muhammad Aurangzeb Alamgir
1539–1675: Period of 8 Sikh Gurus from Guru Angad Dev to Guru Tegh Bahadur
1675–1708: Guru Gobind Singh (10th Sikh Guru)
1699: Birth of the Khalsa
1708–1713: Conquests of Banda Bahadur
1722: Birth of Ahmed Shah Durrani, either in Multan in Mughal Empire or Herat in Afghanistan
1714–1759: Sikh chiefs (Sardars) war against Afghans & Mughal Governors
1739: Invasion by Nader Shah and defeat of weakened Mughal Empire
1747–1772: Durrani Empire led by Ahmad Shah Durrani
1756–1759: Sikh and Maratha Empire cooperation in the Punjab
1761: The Third Battle of Panipat, between the Durrani Empire against the Maratha Empire.
1762: 2nd massacre (Ghalughara) from Ahmed Shah’s 2nd invasion
1765–1801: Rise of the Sikh Misls which gained control of significant swathes of Punjab
1801–1839: Sikh Empire also known as Sarkar Khalsa, Rule by Maharaja Ranjit Singh
1845–1846: First Anglo-Sikh War
1846: Jammu joined with the new state of Jammu and Kashmir
1848–1849: Second Anglo-Sikh War
1849: Complete annexation of Punjab into British India
1849–1947: British rule
1901: Peshawar and adjoining districts separated from the Punjab Province
1911: Parts of Delhi separated from Punjab Province
1947: The Partition of India divided Punjab into two parts. The Eastern part (with two rivers) became the Indian Punjab and the Western part (three rivers) the Pakistan Punjab
1966: Indian Punjab divided into three parts: Punjab, Haryana, and Himachal Pradesh
1973–1995: Punjab insurgency

 




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